Elisabeth Moss to star as ‘Typhoid Mary’ in new BBC series
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Elisabeth Moss to star as ‘Typhoid Mary’ in new BBC series

Variety

Elisabeth Moss has signed on to star in and executive produce a new BBC America limited series about the infamous “Typhoid Mary,” Variety has learned.

BBC America will partner with Moss and Annapurna Television on developing the period drama titled “Fever,” based on Mary Beth Keane’s novel of the same name. It tells the true story of Mary Mallon, an Irish immigrant and cook who was the first known healthy carrier of typhoid fever. She became known as “Typhoid Mary” as she unknowingly spread the disease among several wealthy families in early twentieth century New York.

Moss acquired the original rights to Keane’s book and first sent the material Phil Morrison, who signed on as director and executive producer. Robin Veith is currently set to write the adaptation and will also serve as an executive producer alongside Moss, Morrison, and Annapurna’s Sue Naegle and Megan Ellison.

I’m so honored to be working with the incredible team of collaborators we have pulled together with Phil, Robin, BBC America and Annapurna,Moss said. “I look forward to telling this story about one of the most infamous women in America, ‘Typhoid Mary,’ a woman whose true tale has never been told. She was an immigrant in turn of the century New York, a time of huge change and progress in America. She was incredibly unique, stubborn, ambitious and in fierce denial of any wrongdoing until her death where she lived out her days imprisoned on an island just off of the Bronx in NY. She is incredibly complicated, something I seem to enjoy playing.

Moss is represented by WME and Ribisi Entertainment Group. Veith is also with WME while Morrison is repped by UTA and Management 360.

Elisabeth Moss On Being a Boss Lady and ‘Hot Mess’
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Elisabeth Moss On Being a Boss Lady and ‘Hot Mess’

WWD

“The Handmaid’s Tale” star, who produced two films and starred in three more over the last year, joked, “Sometimes I feel like a hot mess.”

Since winning her first Emmy last year, for lead actress in “The Handmaid’s Tale,Elisabeth Moss has certainly kept herself busy until today, where’s she nominated again for her performance in the Hulu drama’s second season.

I’ve done another season of the show and four — no, five — movies,” she says. Moss, who is a producer on “Handmaid’s,” also produced and starred in “Her Smell,” which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival this month, and “Shirley,” about the horror writer Shirley Jackson.

She also appears in “The Old Man & The Gun” with Robert Redford, just wrapped “The Kitchen” with Melissa McCarthy and Tiffany Haddish, and is still in production on Jordan Peele’s latest film.

I’m actually super lazy and like to sleep a lot and don’t like to do much at all, but I do like acting, so when opportunities present themselves it’s difficult to say no — and there’s just some really good scripts lately,” she explains.

Moss was the guest of honor at Sunday’s Los Angeles Confidential pre-Emmys fete, and she took a moment to reflect on her work behind the camera.

You approach the project in such a different way when you are producing it because you are involved from the start like buying a property, like a book, and developing it from there. I pretty much always ask to be a producer, especially if you are the lead role, because you know, it’s your face that’s out there, and the more ownership you can have, why not?

She continues, “For me, I never wanted it to be a vanity title, and I think there’s definitely a little bit of that sometimes. But there are women producers who are not actresses who have really inspired me and there’s a couple actresses who were the first, like Drew Barrymore, Reese Witherspoon, Julia Roberts and Sandra Bullock, who produce really good s–t.

She says Witherspoon in particular “has an incredible eye.” “In one year, she did ‘Gone Girl’ and ‘Wild.’ She bought two of the hottest book properties before they were even out, I think. That’s not because you’re famous and you’re an actress; she actually has a knack for it creatively and those are the kinds of people I admire.

As for her work on “Handmaid’s,” Moss will begin shooting Season 3 next month.

The thing people don’t realize is how much we departed from the book in Season 1 and how much we changed and added with Margaret [Atwood]’s blessing so we weren’t as afraid of that concept as other people may have thought in Season 2. Of course, there are things we’re going to have to develop because the book is a first-person narrative. The thing that was most important to us was keeping the darkly humorous tone of the book. In Season 3, we are still mining the book,” she says.

For those who are already stressed out about not getting to binge enough of the show, Moss warns, “We are not interested in going on for 20 years; we have a story to tell and when it’s done it’s done. It’s always good to leave a party a little early. All my favorite shows, they’ve ended and you wanted more.

It will leave her more time to make passion projects like “Her Smell,” in which she plays a self-destructive punk rocker named Becky.

It’s a really intense character. She’s really out there, very abrasive and not always fun to be around or fun to watch, so it was a little scary watching it with a big group of people [in Toronto]. “Just when you feel like you’ve maybe had enough and you can’t watch this person self-destruct any longer, the film changes and gives you a wonderful relief.”

She’s also very relaxed on Emmy day. “The hardest part is making sure you get in the car on time,” she says.

Those watching the red carpet will notice her new, edgy blonde look.

In the last year [stylist] Karla Welch and I have been doing a lot of soft, classy, pretty-girl looks so we decided to change it up and do something a bit more rock ‘n’ roll-inspired by my playing a punk rocker. I’m not a fashion person or a model, so for me, the only fun thing about photo shoots is playing a character. We wanted to show another, probably more accurate side to me. And I’m a hot mess right now,” she laughs.

Elisabeth Moss Says She Would Do a ‘West Wing’ Revival ‘in a Heartbeat’
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Elisabeth Moss Says She Would Do a ‘West Wing’ Revival ‘in a Heartbeat’

US Magazine

Paging Aaron Sorkin! Elisabeth Moss would be thrilled to reprise her role in The West Wing if the Emmy-winning NBC drama ever returned to television.

Oh, my God, in a heartbeat,” she exclusively told Us Weekly at the premiere of New York Film Festival premiere of her new film, Her Smell. “Of course! Obviously.”

Moss recurred as Zoe Bartlet, youngest daughter of President Jed Bartlet, in 26 episodes of the political drama, all the way until the show’s series finale — which aired the year before she became a household name as Peggy Olson in Mad Men.

Talking to Us at the premiere on Saturday, September 29, Moss said it would be “too soon” for a Mad Men revival, but the time is right for a West Wing continuation since the show’s 2006 series finale was “so long ago” at this point.

Yeah, why not?” she added.

In the meantime, Moss is earning rave reviews and prestigious awards for her role as Offred in The Handmaid’s Tale. At the event on Saturday, the Emmy winner reflected on the Hulu drama’s relevance to the #MeToo movement and the ongoing fight for women’s equality.

It’s bizarre,” she told Us. “It’s very bizarre, honestly. I’ve never done anything where there have been so many correlations … I don’t know. It’s bizarre. It’s also rewarding to feel like you’re telling a story that’s important, and telling a story that’s relevant and that people should listen to. And that’s the problem — because we’re not listening and watching these stories. It feels rewarding to be a part of it.

And now fans will see a different side of Moss in Her Smell, as she plays a punk rocker struggling with sobriety. “It was really fun,” she revealed to Us. “There were no limits, there was nothing too far, nothing too crazy that you could do, and that’s incredibly freeing. Especially after something like Handmaid’s, where often I’m quite subtle and suppressed, it was really cool to just be able to throw that all away and just go totally mad.

The West Wing is currently streaming on Netflix, and The Handmaid’s Tale is available on Hulu. A release date for Her Smell has not been announced.

With reporting by Nicki Gostin

Elisabeth Moss on ‘Her Smell’ and Why She Won’t Do a ‘Mad Men’ Reboot
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Elisabeth Moss on ‘Her Smell’ and Why She Won’t Do a ‘Mad Men’ Reboot

Vanity FairElisabeth Moss puts it all out there as the strung-out rock star at the center of “Her Smell.

The Alex Ross Perry drama earned raves for the Emmy winner when it screened at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, with many critics noting that the drug-addled, hard-partying singer is a change of pace role for Moss who tends to portray more outwardly composed characters in shows such as “Mad Men.” Moss learned to play the guitar and does her own singing in the film, a stretch that she found alternately terrifying and exhilarating.

Her Smell” is Moss’s third collaboration with Perry — the two previously worked together on “Listen Up Philip” and “Queen of Earth.” On the eve of the film’s Toronto debut, Moss spoke with Variety about drawing on Axl Rose for inspiration, the feminist side of punk rock, and why she thinks her Hulu hit “The Handmaid’s Tale” has resonated with audiences.

What’s behind your frequent collaborations with Alex?

It’s simple. He writes really good scripts, and ‘Her Smell’ had an incredible female lead that most people wouldn’t have thought of me for. We also have a good yin and yang. He’s good at things I’m not good at and vice versa. I’d make six more movies with him if I could.

Why did you want to play Becky Something in ‘Her Smell’?

She’s larger than life. She’s volatile, emotional, sensitive, and she has this terrible toxic combination of extreme confidence and very high self-esteem. When she’s at her best, she’s so fun and you want to be around her, and when she’s bad, she’s the worst demon to deal with.

What kind of research did you do to play the role?

I read a lot about that era of punk music. In the ’80s and ’90s, there were actually a bunch of incredible female punk artists and bands as part of this riot girl movement. I didn’t try to emulate any one person, but Alex says there’s a lot of Axl Rose in her and that he’s an inspiration.

She’s an addict, so I spoke to a few people who will remain anonymous about what it’s like to be addicted to drugs. You can look on YouTube to see how you behave if you take a particular drug, but the most interesting thing that someone told me was this idea that the drugs stop working at some point. You’re always chasing a high, and you can’t take enough to get to the same place, so you just take more and more.

Did you sing and play the guitar for the film or did you lip synch and play along to pre-recorded tracks?

It’s me. I started learning the guitar in the middle of Season 2 [of ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’]. I remember telling my instructor, I’m not here to have a career change. I just need to learn these songs. Alex told me that I didn’t have to learn to play, I could fake it. But in order to fake playing the guitar believably, you have to learn to play it. There’s no in-between.

Will you keep performing music?

It was just for the role, but it was such a rush to pretend to be a rock star. It’s one of those crazy, cool things you get to do when you’re an actor. It’s so validating to get up in front of all these people and sing and play. They’re are all these extras that are hired to cheer and scream and make you feel like you’re amazing.

Why do you think fans have embraced ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’?

The material is incredibly relevant. It’s tapping into a feeling of anxiety and frustration that’s really out there right now in this political moment.

Would you do another season of ‘Top of the Lake’?

In a heartbeat. [Creator] Jane Campion could make me fly to New Zealand and read the telephone book. It’s not up to me, but I love that character. She’s so challenging and exciting to play, but we have to have the right idea. The last season wrapped things up well, so we have to have a good reason to come back.

From “Murphy Brown” to “Will & Grace,” there are lots of television revivals right now. Would you want to revive “Mad Men”?

I’d love to do anything that [creator] Matt Weiner writes, but it would be a different show. That series was about this group of people living in a very specific era. I guess never say never, but I think the show ended pretty well. Sometimes it’s best to leave the party before everybody wants to kick you out.

Elisabeth Moss and Alex Ross Perry challenge themselves and the audience with ‘Her Smell’
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Elisabeth Moss and Alex Ross Perry challenge themselves and the audience with ‘Her Smell’

LA Times

This year’s Toronto International Film Festival has an unexpected onslaught of movies centered around female singers. There’s the splashy “A Star Is Born,” starring Lady Gaga, the headier “Vox Lux” with Natalie Portman, the rootsy “Wild Rose” featuring a breakout turn by Jessie Buckley and the yearning “Teen Spirit,” with Elle Fanning.

And then there is “Her Smell,” a wild, churning character study like no other starring Elisabeth Moss as Becky Something, the leader of a fictional ’90s rock group called Something She.

Just like its lead character, the film is aggressive and purposefully obnoxious. It more or less dares an audience to live through its forceful, unrelenting energy — and the self-destructive, pushy pitch of Moss’ performance — for most of the two-hour-plus running time to ultimately get to a place of serenity, self-knowledge and grace.

The movie is the third collaboration between Moss and writer-director Alex Ross Perry, following the literary romantic roundelays of “Listen Up Philip” and the female-centric psychodrama of “Queen of Earth.” The award-winning star of “Mad Men” and “The Handmaid’s Tale” may seem an unlikely fit with a low-budget filmmaker specializing in caustic examinations of discontent, but they have forged one of the most energizing partnerships on the current indie scene.

It just kind of works for some reason,Moss said. “Obviously there’s a really basic thing which is like we both want to make not only good films but films that haven’t been done before — films that we haven’t done before. We both really wanted to challenge ourselves, particularly with this movie.”

Her Smell” had its world premiere Sunday night as part of the Toronto festival’s Platform section. Perry’s film brings an outsized ensemble into Becky’s vortex of bad vibes, including Becky’s bandmates played by Agyness Deyn and Gayle Rankin, a younger band played by Cara Delevingne, Ashley Benson and Dylan Gelula, a pop-star rival by Amber Heard, a record executive by Eric Stoltz, an ex by Dan Stevens and Becky’s mother by Virginia Madsen.

And though the inspiration for Becky Something in “Her Smell” would presumably be the world of ’90s rock figures such Courtney Love of Hole, Kim and Kelley Deal of the Breeders or riot grrrl-era bands such as Bikini Kill, L7 or Sleater-Kinney, according to Perry, the film instead found its main impetus in the recent Guns N’ Roses reunion tour — and in the structure of Shakespeare.

If you can make it so I’m a little bit struggling, just on the edge of being like, ‘I don’t know if I can do this,’ that’s what I want.

In summer 2016, Perry saw a Guns N’ Roses reunion concert, a production of “The Merchant of Venice” featuring his “Listen Up Philip” actor Jonathan Pryce, and Kenneth Branagh’s four-hour screen adaptation of “Hamlet.” Something clicked watching the rise and fall of Shakespeare’s characters.

 “I can see how it would seem unusual,” admitted Perry, who also co-wrote this summer’s Disney hit “Christopher Robin,” in an interview alongside Moss here this week.

I’d been kind of promising Lizzie this script for a while just saying I have this character and I know her name and then a year passed and then this month happened. At the end of it I said, I know this movie now,” said Perry. “And then six months later I had a script.

Moss ended up with only a week between the end of shooting the second season of “Handmaid’s Tale” — for which she has subsequently been nominated for two Emmys ahead of next week’s ceremony — and the start of production for “Her Smell.”

Becky speaks in a wild, nonstop patois all her own, a raging torrent of words, which combined with an abrasive demeanor made the character uniquely difficult even for a performer as experienced as Moss

It was hard. It was one of the only things I’ve done that wasn’t always fun,Moss said.

Because I do a lot of really dark, challenging material, if you can challenge me at this point, you get such a really big gold star from me,” she said before pausing. “I’m trying to word it without sounding egotistical, but if you can make it so I’m a little bit struggling, just on the edge of being like, ‘I don’t know if I can do this,’ that’s what I want. I want you to put me in a place where I’m not sure if I can do it. That’s interesting to me.

In preparing for the role, Moss tried to borrow from a range of inspirations, so that the character couldn’t be too closely tied to any one person. She watched documentaries on Marilyn Monroe, and studied people across the spectrum of fame for how they grappled with addiction.

And just as there are multiple female pop-star movies at TIFF this year, there are also numerous films dealing with addiction, including “Ben Is Back,” starring Julia Roberts and Lucas Hedges, and “Beautiful Boy,” with Steve Carell and Timothée Chalamet. Yet despite Becky’s appetites for any substance she can get her hands on, Perry says his film is not a story of addiction.

Honestly, if I’m being serious, the thing I say is the movie is about identity,” said Perry. “It’s not about nineties music. It’s not about the dynamics of a band. It’s not about celebrity and not about motherhood, it’s not about addiction, it’s about identity. Simply put, this is a movie that has nine characters, all of whom live their lives with a name that is not their name. And that, to me, is the movie.

The style of the movie is deliberately extreme — from the churning, disorienting sound design to Becky’s abhorrent behavior. A negative review in the Hollywood Reporter called the film “excruciatingly self-indulgent” as well as “ugly and off-putting.” Even a positive notice in IndieWire referred to it as “obscenely unpleasant.”

For Perry, delivering the first three acts as a full-on whirlwind is purely intentional, designed to take people well past a conventional breaking point.

I think in a punk movie about punk women, you want that adrenaline,” Perry said. “The characters give you license to make a movie that just goes and goes and goes and goes. It goes like cocaine. It goes like electricity plugged into an amp. It goes like a neon sign buzzing for three acts. And to me it’s an appropriate thing based on what the movie’s about and what the characters are.

“It’s also just a gigantic challenge that I wanted to do both on the page and then an even bigger challenge on set,” Perry said. “I, as someone who’s very low-key and fairly lazy — can I make something that has a relentlessness to it?

Moss herself had a revelation about the movie while watching it for the first time on a big screen in Toronto.

This film is not her point of view. It’s from the point of view of the other people,” said Moss. “It puts you through what Becky put those people around her through. It is in-your-face. She is annoying. It can be off-putting. It’s a lot. You just want to take a … break. You’re also kind of drawn to her and want to know where she is. You’re looking for her when she’s not there. It puts you through what the people around her go through.”

Late in the movie, Moss performs a spare, heartfelt rendition of Bryan Adams’ “Heaven” at a piano for just her young daughter in a startling, single unbroken take. After all that Becky and the movie have put audiences through, both Moss and Perry say that reaching that catharsis is the point.

I felt like that’s the movie,” Perry said. “If we can get people there — it’s literally the last thing in the world you would expect to happen in this movie after the first hour. So therefore we’ve got to do it.

Check the pics in our gallery:

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > Pep. 9 | TIFF

  
Elisabeth Moss Goes Down Rabbit Hole Of Manic Self-Destruction As ’90s Punk Rocker
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Elisabeth Moss Goes Down Rabbit Hole Of Manic Self-Destruction As ’90s Punk Rocker

Deadline

In Her SmellElisabeth Moss’ third film with writer-director Alex Ross Perry, the Emmy and Golden Globe winner trades in dystopian hopelessness for a different kind of darkness, throwing herself entirely into the anarchy of the ’90s punk rock world.

Starring alongside Cara Delevingne, Amber Heard, Ashley Benson, Dylan Gelula and more, Moss is Becky Something, the brilliant and brilliantly self-destructive front woman of ’90s rock band Something She, struggling with sobriety and alienating everyone in her path in the years of her creative decline. Clearly something of a muse for Perry, Moss is drawn to the “really great female roles” the director has written time and time again. “[He] makes movies that other people aren’t making, very unique,” the actress told Deadline, appearing with Perry, Delevingne, Heard, Benson and Gelula. “That’s the kind of stuff that I want to do.

Prepping for the film—which focuses, atypically, on the fall from rock star glory, rather than the ascent—Moss reached out to individuals from the music world who could speak to this aspect of the rock star’s experience. “To be fair, you did watch YouTube videos of girls tripping on meth in Walmarts,” Perry joked, with regard to her research process.

Setting out to write a great role for Moss that we haven’t seen from the actress before, Perry was cognizant of the fact that there wasn’t much precedent for the kind of project he had in mind. “There’s a lot of music movies in the world, but I think that the genre of this movie is something that no one really makes movies about, or takes particularly seriously,” he said. Many of the “women in rock, or girl punk movies” that do exist were made in the ’80s, when this musical culture was new, the director noted. “People haven’t started really looking back at it, and certainly not at the ‘90s, which felt like something that I just had never seen before.

Writing the film around the time of the 2016 Guns N’ Roses reunion tour, Perry wanted Becky to be “that machismo, swinging attitude, vulgar male rock star”—akin to Axl Rose or Oasis frontman Liam Gallagher. To portray the punk rock world convincingly on screen, Perry had all of his actresses in the film’s two central bands go through their own musical boot camp. “We all had different journeys with the instruments. I had four or five months, I guess, of trying to learn how to play something, and everyone just kind of jumped in really head first,Moss said. “It was really, I think, scary for a lot of us. It’s not what we do, but we were very supported by each other in our anxiety about it.

To hear more from the Her Smell stars about their preparations for Perry’s latest film—which marks something of a creative departure for the indie writer/director—take a look above.

Elisabeth Moss Studied Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, and Marilyn Monroe to Play an Unleashed Rock Star in ‘Her Smell’ — TIFF
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Elisabeth Moss Studied Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, and Marilyn Monroe to Play an Unleashed Rock Star in ‘Her Smell’ — TIFF

IndieWire

The actress and producer tells IndieWire she turned to some of Hollywood’s biggest tragedies to inspire her role in Alex Ross Perry’s hard-hitting rock drama.

It’s easy to hate Becky Something, the hurricane of rock n’ roll destruction at the center of Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell.” Played with ferocious intensity by actress and producer Elisabeth Moss, the star’s third teaming with Perry sees Moss hitting another high note after the pair’s vicious “Queen of Earth,” but it also comes with a timely addiction narrative that she was eager to get right.

Told in a five-act structure and interspersed with flashbacks, “Her Smell” unfolds over nearly a decade as Becky and her bandmates (Agyness Deyn and Gayle Rankin, worthy matches for Moss) struggle with the price of fame and creative freedom as their band, Something She, rises and falls, mostly due to Becky’s whims.

As the band cycles through bad gigs (three out of five of the film’s acts take place in grimy backstages) and even worse trips, Becky is forced to grapple with the havoc she’s wreaked on everyone around her, made still more frightening by her drug addiction and emotional unease.

It’s familiar territory for Moss and Perry, who previously used 2015’s “Queen of Earth” to stage another incisive view into the bonds between women threatened by mental illness, but “Her Smell” goes even deeper.

Moss remembers her “Queen of Earth” director texting her in 2015 with an idea: to follow “a rock star who was on the outs in her career and was an addict and had a baby, and dealing with that, what that would be like to have that kind of addiction and lifestyle and have a baby.” That’s all she needed, and she encouraged Perry to write so they could set about making it.

First, however, she had to prepare for the role that would be emotionally and physically draining, from her on-stage performances to some high-energy tantrums.

I watched any music documentary I could get my hands on, honestly,Moss told IndieWire in a recent interview. “All the usual suspects, ‘Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck,’ which I’d already seen but now I’ve seen a million times, ‘Amy,’ the Amy Winehouse documentary. And also things on Marilyn Monroe, like that kind of thing, just to get a grasp of that fame and that addiction. Anything I could find about somebody who was incredibly famous or successful, but also dealing with addiction, was very helpful.

Some early reactions to the film compared Becky to Courtney Love, but Moss bristles a bit at the need to trade one blonde rocker for another. As she put it, “Why isn’t she Axl Rose?

Moss also looked beyond well-publicized stories of Hollywood tragedy, opting to spend time with recovering addicts who showed her “things that you can’t get from reading a book or watching a documentary, but things that were very real.

I have not, thankfully, dealt with addiction myself personally, but I tried as much as I could to, not just watch documentaries, but actually talk to people who’ve dealt with it and were now sober,Moss said. “A couple of people that I spoke to, obviously who will remain anonymous, were so open and vulnerable about it. … You actually have to be able to talk about it, and you have to be able to face it.

The film doesn’t glamorize drugs; instead, it drops the audience into Becky’s story long after she has gone off the rails. “It was very important for me to try to be as accurate and truthful about that as possible,Moss said. “That’s why we don’t even show a lot of drugs being taken in the movie, because we do not want to glamorize it. We want to show the effects on the people around her, of that addiction.

For Moss, those effects were the most informative element of the film. “I think that it’s one thing to be crazy and fun, and say crazy shit and talk really fast, but it’s specifically in Act Three, which is at the height of her demise, she’scruel,Moss said. “So much of the film deals with not only the person who is going through the addiction, but how it affects everyone in her orbit, her bandmates, her ex-husband, her child, her mother, and affects the people that are connected to them.

She continued, “When you’re that fucked up and you’ve really lost yourself, you can go places that you would never think that somebody would be able to go.

Her Smell” premiered at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival. It is currently seeking U.S. distribution.

Elisabeth Moss Finally Gets to Cut Loose in Her Smell
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Elisabeth Moss Finally Gets to Cut Loose in Her Smell

Vanity Fair  

Alex Ross Perry’s rock-star movie will be divisive—but there’s magic in it when Moss is on-screen.

Resolved: rock stars are a handful. Few recent movies attest to this as brashly, or as uncomfortably, as Her Smell, the newest collaboration between offbeat indie writer and director Alex Ross Perry and his as-ever surprising, invigorating star, Elisabeth Moss.

Moss plays Becky Something, lead singer, in the 1990s, of the three-woman punk band Something She—which used to sell out large venues and grace the cover of Spinmagazine but has, as of the movie’s opening minutes, fallen into a bit of a slump.

You can thank Becky for that. Loud, unpredictable, chain-smoking Becky, who’s been canceling tours at the last minute, who insists on dragging an overpaid and likely fraudulent shaman with her from venue to venue to cleanse her life of bad vibes—which must be hard when Becky is the bad vibe. Her behavior backstage and in the studio has prevented the band from releasing an album for years; audiences have shrunken down to their nostalgic devotees. She’s an addict, plain and simple. And Her Smell gives us a front-row seat to how powerfully this undermines her relationships and her sense of who she is, to say nothing of her career.

 Not that you’re entirely aware of her condition at first. One of the more curious choices Perry makes in Her Smell is to avoid a specific sense, for most of the film’s run time, of just what’s driven Becky off the rails. We never see her drink or do drugs; in the film’s opening stretches, she could just as well be having a manic episode—or, frankly, be acting like a rock star. Which must be the point. Her Smellopens exhaustingly, with the world-consuming orgy of bad behavior that, as anyone who’s followed the lives of Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, or Axl Rose knows, come with the territory.

But that doesn’t mitigate the utter shock, the outsize discomfort, of Her Smell’s opening minutes. Perry and his sterling cast jump-start their movie by throwing us to the wolves. Becky, backstage with her bandmates, Marielle (Agyness Deyn) and Ali (Gayle Rankin), after a show, is chaos incarnate—and so is the filmmaking, a whirlwind of clashing colors and tight shots that makes the bodies on-screen feel like they’re in a constant state of collision. Becky’s by turns distraught, amused, angry face smears the screen with unpredictable emotion, against a constant clash and clatter of music.

 What’s happening is easy enough to suss out: Becky is high, and has received a visitor—“Dirtbag” Dan (Dan Stevens), ex-husband and father of her child—whose presence, and new wife, seem to set her off. Other things happen. Her manager, Howard (Eric Stoltz), has reached the end of his patience, to say nothing of his credit line. Zelda E. Zekiel (Amber Heard), Becky’s former collaborator, has arrived with an offer to perform together—which Something She needs, but which Becky, proud and erratic, declines.

It’s just one stage in a series of high-strung encounters Perry and Moss have cooked up for their heroine, whose behavior is tracked in five spacious, aesthetically discreet scenes, each separated by home-video interludes of the good old days—when the band was still young, still traveling. We tag along with Something She in the midst of their downfall, from the backstage antics, to a disastrous studio encounter in which Becky latches onto a younger girl group (played by Cara Delevingne, Dylan Gelula, and Ashley Benson) in a rash attempt at rejuvenation, to—in a clear-eyed, disheartened moment of sobriety—Becky’s home, a year after the film’s opening showdowns.

It’s all there, in a clear arc, to lead us to the film’s final moments: when Becky has sobered up, has attempted reconciliation with her band, and is thinking of taking the leap back into her damaged career. But even that sequence is as nauseating and unpredictable as the rest. The movie knows that though an addict may clean up her act, the damage to everyone else lingers, despite their faith. They all seem to know that things could go wrong again any minute—which doesn’t stop them from giving Becky extra chances. Love is, unexpectedly, the force that buoys the movie. Marielle says it best: “You were horrible, but it never made me not love you.”

Is it redemption what the movie’s after? Somewhat. But what I love about the last leg of the film is that it’s all so tenuous. If the movie hits with you, that hesitation to trust is what ultimately breaks your heart. The fragility of it—of the world built atop the ashes from when the addict let the world burn.

Her Smell sounds like a sentimental story, and it’s true that by the end, I was surprised by how moved I was; you wouldn’t predict from the chaos of the film’s opening hour and change that it plans to swing around toward clarity—and Becky’s fear of it. I watched the whole film with a knot in my stomach, and that’s largely thanks to Moss, who roars and rampages with an abandon we’ve rarely seen from her—except in Perry’s movies. (This is their third collaboration, after 2015’s Queen of Earth and 2014’s Listen Up Philip.)

In Her Smell, Moss hops and flits and stomps around from subject to subject, crisis to crisis, with mock-Shakespearean villainy—her insults are delightful doses of venom—and an extraordinarily damaged sense of largesse. You don’t need to see her doing coke to know that it’s the gas in her tank, catapulting her off the deep end. To say nothing of all the buried traumas and disappointments, hinted at in the script, that Moss slyly signals in the precision of her whirligig moods.

Watching the movie, I laughed more than I expected to, but in a sick way; Perry’s humor often comes with the price of noxious disgust. (Remember seeing two siblings kiss in The Color Wheel?) I didn’t know what the film was ultimately about until this last section—which is also when something truly clicked for me in Moss’s performance. What resounds is not merely the sense that Moss is great, but the sense that we’ve barely scratched the surface of what she can do.

IndieWire: Elisabeth Moss Is One of the Most Noxious Movie Characters of All Time in Brave and Rewarding Punk Epic
Filed in Articles Elisabeth Her Smell Interviews Movies News

IndieWire: Elisabeth Moss Is One of the Most Noxious Movie Characters of All Time in Brave and Rewarding Punk Epic

IndieWire

So about that title. It stinks. It’s pungent and rancid. “Her Smell” could have a positive connotation, but you just know that it doesn’t here. There’s a hostility to it, like an odorous barrier you’d have to get through in order to reach the woman exuding it. Viewers familiar with any of Alex Ross Perry’s previous films will probably be holding their noses as they walk into this one. Newbies might want to follow suit.

Perry knows what he’s doing. His work has always had the courage to be profoundly unpleasant. We’re talking about a guy whose breakthrough film (“The Color Wheel”) was a micro-budget 16mm road trip comedy that built to a sudden eruption of incest, and whose comparatively star-studded follow-ups (“Listen Up, Philip,” “Queen of Earth,” and “Golden Exits”) have shined a light on some of New York’s shittiest people. The most “likable character” in his entire body of work is a cat named Gadzookey. But if all of Perry’s stories have been hard to stomach, “Her Smell” takes things to impressive new lows before hitting bottom and tunneling out through the other side. It’s truly one of the most noxious movies ever made, which might help to explain why it’s also Perry’s best.

Imagine if Danny Boyle’s “Steve Jobs” was about Courtney Love in the mid-’90s and you’ll be on the right track. Chronicling the reckless fall and cautious rise of punk rocker Becky Something — lead singer of the band Something She — “Her Smell” is told across five long scenes that stretch over 10 years, each of the vignettes unfolding in real time. Three of them take place in the snaking bowels of a concert venue’s backstage area, where the drug-addled riot grrrl (a bravely loathsome and unhinged Elisabeth Moss) is surrounded by fellow musicians (Amber Heard), her manager (Eric Stoltz as Howard Goodman), her mother (Virginia Madsen), her ex (Dan Stevens), their baby, and even some kind of huckster shaman who she’s paid to cloud her mind with nonsense.

Every member of this motley crew is hanging on for dear life, trying to weather a storm that’s been raging around them since Becky Something first became famous. Most of them seem like decent people, especially Becky’s two longtime bandmates: Ali van der Wolff (“GLOW” star Gayle Rankin) and the star’s closest friend, Marielle Hell (a raw and layered Agyness Deyn, already making good on the incredible promise she displayed in “Sunset Song”).

The other girls are guilty of all the usual vices, but they’re nothing like their lead singer. Becky is nothing short of a manic emotional terrorist on bath salts. She’s your estranged older sister, the girl you don’t want to talk to at a party, the crazy lady on the bus, and the musician who’s auditioning for her own episode of “Behind the Music” all rolled into one. She exclusively speaks in the kind of coked out, incoherent stage banter that demands some applause even if you can’t understand it; one second she’s smiling, the next she’s trying to stab Marielle with a shard of broken glass. The more Becky smiles, the harder she cries. Her mascara runs an ultra-marathon every night. Nobody describes her smell, but I’d guess it’s something like the stench that would come from throwing a cherry bomb into a meth lab.

Later, after it becomes clear that Becky is far too broken to finish her new album, Howard signs a wide-eyed trio called the Akergirls in a desperate bid to save his label, the film’s ridiculously loaded cast growing even larger with the introduction of Ashley Benson, Cara Delevingne, and Dylan Gelula (all of whom are terrific, even if their specific pop-punk vibe doesn’t feel like it has any real cultural precedent, and the movie suffers as a result). Becky is the rotted trunk of a wilting family tree that’s still adding new branches, and Perry forces us to watch the decay from the inside out.

More loudly stylized than his earlier films, “Her Smell” is visceral nightmare from the moment it starts; if the script evokes John Cassavetes, the aesthetic seems more inspired by Gaspar Noé. Sean Price Williams’ sinuous 35mm tracking shots follow Becky and her bandmates through the grimy backstage halls, taking us deep into a labyrinth of pain and self-preservation. Keegan DeWitt’s queasy, bass-heavy score pounds through the ceiling, like the entire first half of the movie takes place on the floor below the loudest house party of all time. Huge chunks of the dialogue are drowned out by the din, which is just as well, because every word you hear from Becky makes you loathe her more.

Moss is such a whirling dervish that you can’t help but fear for the safety of those around her. You wonder how they don’t give up. “Where do you find the faith?” one of them asks. It’s a rhetorical question. At this point, it’s hard to believe that Perry even knows where to look.

But then it turns. Time passes. We realize that, in broad strokes, “Her Smell” is sort of like “A Star Is Born” in reverse (though Olivier Assayas’ “Clean” might be the more helpful reference point). Becky gets sober, the film u-turns towards catharsis, and — for the first time in his career — Perry leans hard into sincerity. The second half of the movie is so rich and hopeful that it almost feels like a sweet reward for not walking out of the theater. After running our hands under a burning hot faucet for more than an hour, Perry turns off the tap and lets the burn sink in.

Highlighted by a moving and uncut piano rendition of Bryan Adams’ “Heaven” — easily the most convincing music scene in the movie, as Moss’ looks sheepish and lost when she’s onstage for the Something She gigs — these scenes are an absolute reckoning, and they get under our skin because of all we had to suffer through in order to see them.

One beautifully framed shot, in which Moss strums a guitar with her back turned to Deyn, aches with a lifetime of regret, as we come to appreciate how Becky wore her addiction (and general awfulness) as a suit of armor to protect herself from, well, everything but herself. As much as the people in her life used to need her, she needs them now even more. It’s unexpectedly moving to see the most narcissistic and insufferable character Perry has ever written earn a chance to become his most redemptive, as well.

It takes an unfathomable degree of confidence to bury such a resonant story about the strength we get from each other in the backend of an obscenely unpleasant 135-minute ordeal that’s designed to make you give up on the movie at every turn, but that bold stroke is what allows the final chapters of “Her Smell” to go up your nose and get under your skin. For us, it feels like an endurance test. For Perry, it carries the whiff of an exorcism. Time passes. People change. Artists grow up, and sometimes the good ones get even better.

Elisabeth Moss says ‘Her Smell’ role “Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done”
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Elisabeth Moss says ‘Her Smell’ role “Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done”

The Hollywood Reporter – Elisabeth Moss is back in Toronto, where she stars in the locally shot Hulu drama The Handmaid’s Tale, for which she won both an Emmy and a Golden Globe for best actress in a drama.

But Moss is this week at the Toronto Film Festival to debut her latest movie, Alex Ross Perry’s Her Smell, where she plays a maniacally destructive punk rock star battling substance abuse and personal demons in a failed bid to stay famous and creative.

This was the hardest thing I’ve ever done,Moss said of her third collaboration with Perry and her role as Becky Something, the brilliant and brash frontwoman of a ’90s rock band who finds herself giving up everything and everyone as her emotional freight train speeds toward a cliff’s edge.

Before the world premiere for Her Smell on Sunday night at Toronto’s Winter Garden Theater, Moss talked to The Hollywood Reporter‘s Etan Vlessing about preparing to play a self-destructing punk rocker with emotion and sweat, developing skin calluses to play the guitar without pain, and possible award season buzz for her latest movie star turn.

You spend so much time in Toronto shooting The Handmaid’s Tale. How does it feel bringing Her Smell to TIFF?

Toronto has become a second home. I’ve spent so much time there, around six or seven months of the year. I spend more time in Toronto than I do in New York City, where I live. For me, it’s great. I’m staying at the house that I’m going to live in for season three [of Handmaid’s] for the festival. I know the neighborhood. I can tell the driver where to go, as opposed to a few years ago at the festival when I didn’t know where I was. I know Toronto really well. So it’s incredibly convenient.

In Her Smell, you play Becky Something, a character who battles everyone and everything to stay sober and not self-destruct. How did you balance your character having an emotional breakdown while carrying the movie’s audience on a wild ride?

One of the interesting things is we pick up at the start of her demise, at the start of her descent, rather than her rise to fame. That’s one of the conceits of the script that Alex wanted to do, to watch somebody fall, rather than launch them and see them rise up. We’ve kind of seen that story and know it is a great one. But with this character, you want to see what happens at the beginning of their demise and descent from popularity and fame.

Tell us about who Becky Something is.

She’s an incredible artist and she’s an incredible singer and songwriter and has a vitality to her that’s difficult to keep in a box. She’s an addict, which has a huge effect on her personality and her life. And when we start the movie, she’s at the height of her addiction and struggling to chase the high of the fame and adulation as well. It’s not just the drugs, as she struggles to be as famous and relevant as she once was.

How do you prepare for a role where, emotionally and physically, you hit rock bottom?

I did a lot of research into addiction and spoke to a few people who were very generous and very open and willing to share their stories. It’s amazing how personal the people I spoke to were able to be, as they gave me an insight into issues that are difficult to talk about — not just the mechanics of addiction, but the personal stories.

Becky is an incredible musician. I’m assuming you are not. How did you prepare for that side of the role?

It was about six months of preparation in learning to play the guitar and the piano and learning the songs. I know how to sing, so I listened to a lot of punk and grunge music. I’m not really into either punk or grunge, as I was raised on jazz and blues music and classical, because I was a ballet dancer. So it was a deep dive into that punk and grunge world.